dreamstime_6640001Whatever our opinion about God, we all have one.  And that opinion rings true to us (even if we’re willing to revisit it, test it, adjust it, etc.).  If we only half-believed our opinion (is that even possible?), then our inner conviction would never rise above the level of platitude.  We adopt, or retain, the position that we find personally satisfying.  

Some theological views about God are:

1.   God exists

2.   God does not exist (dogmatic atheism)

3.   God might exist but whether God exists or not doesn’t impact life (practical atheism)

4.   Many gods exist

5.   There’s a good power in the universe and everything’s going to turn out okay

6.  There’s a cranky power in the universe and everything’s going to turn out badly (just kidding)

7.   God has never become incarnate

8.   Jesus is God incarnate

9.   Krishna is god incarnate

10.  To talk to God, I must face Mecca

11.  To talk to God, I must face the Wailing Wall

Each of these statements is a claim about truth.  Even uncertainty is a truth claim; we’ve decided that uncertainty is the truth.  Because we usually have several opinions about God, it’s fair to ask ourselves whether our claims make sense as a whole (are they coherent), whether they fit our everyday experience, and whether they are highly probable or less so.  

Most importantly, we’ll want to ask whether our opinions provoke and inspire us to live morally responsive and responsible lives.  We’ll also want to ask whether our opinions provoke and inspire us to help others flourish too.

Advertisements